When I ran out of my muscle relaxer medicine on Friday night, I had already placed the online refill order. I wasn’t really worried about picking it up on Saturday morning, because there were two refills remaining. Simple, right?
The online order wasn’t confirmed and then the problems started. The pharmacy tech made incorrect assumptions and caused a lot of trouble. Next, she contacted the doctors and told them they must contact her with a new prescription.
Because I had been on vacation, I had to get medicine refills out of state. Using the same pharmacy in a different state was supposed to be easy. The result this time was a nightmare. The muscle relaxer withdrawal was really causing me trouble.
Sunday was when I really noticed the withdrawal symptoms. My pain was much worse, even while taking all the allowed naproxen. By the evening, my whole body felt like it was shutting down. When I looked online to see the withdrawal symptoms, it stated: heart beating faster, higher blood pressure, anxiety, and others.
I certainly felt terrible anxiety and my heart was going much faster than normal. Monday was also horrible. After contacting the pharmacy, they said they were still waiting on the doctor to call. Finally, in the early evening, my husband called the pharmacist and asked what on earth was going on.
The pharmacist mumbled around and finally said they were filling the prescriptions. My husband went immediately and picked up my medicine, along with some food for dinner. I hadn’t been able to cook for over 24 hours. I’m still shaky, and won’t probably get over the withdrawal symptoms for at least another day.
I’m sure that pharmacy workers and pharmacists are under a lot of pressure. They work hard and have numerous people anxious to get their medication. But, there are ways to protect ourselves from pharmacy errors.
1. When the option for pharmacist counseling is offered, take the time to ask any questions you might have about the medicine, side-effects, or interactions.
2. Look inside the bag and check your pills. I’ve once encountered the mistake right there in front of the counter, and was able to show them quickly that they had given me the wrong medicine.
3. The pill description is on the side of the bottle. Look at the pills and make sure that they match. It will say (ex. blue oval pill with letters FVC). If the pills don’t match, take them back.
4. Know your insurance! My policy was changed in January and I’ve found out that my coverage for drugs has changed for the worse. We spent much of the day trying to get clarification of what we’re going to pay. So, make sure you know the prices and shop around.
I hope you don’t need many prescriptions this year. If you have trouble getting them you can appeal the insurance coverage, have your physician fight for you, get prescription assistance, or shop around with the Good Rx or We RX program. Fight for yourself and your wallet.
I hope you don’t need many prescriptions this year. If you have trouble getting them you can appeal the insurance coverage, have your physician fight for you, get prescription assistance, or shop around with the Good Rx or We RX program. Fight for yourself and your wallet.
I hope you don’t need many prescriptions this year. If you have trouble getting them you can appeal the insurance coverage, have your physician fight for you, get prescription assistance, or shop around with the Good Rx or We RX program. Fight for yourself and your wallet.
@2019, copyright Lisa Ehrman

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