Ancient Egypt Homeschool Freebie

Ancient Egypt Homeschool Freebie

Don’t you love Unit Studies?  Here’s a Free Unit on King Tut!  This will be a favorite in your home!

King Tut Mini Unit - Educents

Students LOVE to learn about King Tut and Ancient Egypt! Download a FREE lesson for kids about Ancient Egypt and jump into King Tut’s history! The freebie has several activities included in this pack, including reading comprehension, math review, map skills, and timeline practice, so there are a multiple ways to use them.

Hieroglyphics Math

King Tut Mini Unit - Educents

Use these fun pages to practice place value and/or addition and subtraction skills! Page 12 of the King Tut Mini-Unit Freebie asks students use the symbols to determine the number. The following page goes a step further and asks students add or subtract numbers.

Fun facts about Ancient Egypt:

  • The Egyptian alphabet contained more than 700 hieroglyphs!
  • Egyptians believed cats were a sacred animal and having a pet cat would bring a household good luck.
  • Ancient Egyptians invented pens, toothpaste, and a game very similar to bowling.

More Ancient Egypt resources:

Mini Bio: King Tut – Here’s a mini bio about King Tut to go with your mini unit!


Ancient Egypt Lapbook – Study interesting facts about the discovery of hieroglyphic writing, the Rosetta Stone, the great King Tutankhamun, the lovely Cleopatra and more.

Recipes From Egypt – Delight your little cooks with two authentic and easy-to-make recipes from Egypt: Tameya (the original veggie burger), and Basboosa (Semolina cake with honey and lemon).

My Book About Egypt – My Book About Egypt takes elementary students to the cities of Cairo, Alexandria, Damietta, and Giza.

King Tut Mini Unit - Educents

Want free lessons for kids about Ancient Egypt?

Download the King Tut Mini-Unit Freebie on Educents!

http://www.educents.com/king-tut-mini-unit.html
 #homeschoolmemohelper

Disclosure: Affiliate link enclosed.

Homeschool Science Fun!

Disclosure: This post contains an affiliate link. Check out these science experiments, science freebies, and science books that will make back-to-school fun for everyone. Image SEO Homeschool Science Fun

Magic School Bus Polymer Group Pack

Seat belts everyone! Get ready to grow amazing polymers! Young Scientists grow super balls, snow, rainbow beads, crystal gels, and polymer flowers while learning about the importance and science of super-absorbent polymers. This kit provides enough materials for 30 students and is great for the classroom, after-school programs, science enrichment, boys and girls scouts, camps, and a Magic School Bus birthday Party!

 

FREE – Osmosis: The Colorful Celery Experiment

Image SEO Homeschool Science Fun Are you teaching your students about osmosis? Perhaps it is a part of your science curriculum, or maybe you want to just do a little experimenting… The Colorful Celery Experiment is the perfect introduction to Osmosis. Your students will learn how water moves with this fun experiment.

 

Science Story eBooks – 50% OFF

Image SEO Homeschool Science FunFollow Merrin and Pearl to combine science with adventure in Brainiacs. Also learn about the nervous, digestive, immune, skeletal and circulatory system with a five part series from Human Body Detectives eBooks.

Magic School Bus Inspired Planet Study – 30% OFF

Plan games, worksheets, and coloring pages to expand your young astronomer’s understanding of space! Image SEO Homeschool Science Fun  

 

More Science Resources

Looking for more inspiration for science experiments? Check out these resources:

  • The Young Scientists Club – Engage boys and girls around the world in an educational science adventure that lasts a lifetime.
  • Science printables for older kids – Teach With Fergy offers printable task cards, complete science units, PowerPoint lessons, and more!
  • STEM Mystery Books – Teach science and math with these books full of dozens of one-minute mysteries that kids love to solve!

#homeschoolmemohelper

Lesson Planners

 Oh, my!  Home educating moms need tools to help them plan their school days.  The only problem with lesson planning organizers is that there are so many to choose from.  You can choose old-school paper books: some already bound, some spiral-bound, some loose-leaf, and some printables.  There are also many computer versions.  I think I have tried each type at one time or another.  You’ll probably be influenced  by the size of your student roster, your type of schooling, etc.  You can spend days on the internet searching for your favorite method. The first few years, when I had three students, I used a pre-printed notebook that included many extra pages for organizing.  In recent years, I began using these printable pages.  They were free. 

I used the weekly planner.
I love this method, because it allows flexibility.  I also use a pencil, not a pen.  This provides the ultimate flexibility.  And, homeschool moms really have to be flexible.  
Donna Young’s website is full of wonderful printables and many other tools to help homeschooling moms.  There are so many other wonderful sites out there, too.  Find your favorite.  If you find out you don’t like the features, then try a new type next year.  I love that about homeschooling.  There’s always room for improvement!

@2013, copyright Lisa Ehrman

Favorite Homeschool Resources: Science

Science curriculum is fun to explore.  From early elementary through high school, science covers so many topics.  Using hands-on experiments in preschool and finishing up with Chemistry experiments and Physics in high school, all the topics covered under science include a very long list.  Look at the list assembled here under the headings: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth Science.  Wow!!!

Deciding what to teach can be achieved in many ways.  You can follow a traditional scope & sequence and use a traditional or unit study approach.  Using a scope & sequence prepares your child for testing, college, and provides a good foundation.   All students need a good foundation in science. 

In our early years, we used A Beka science curriculum.  We also supplemented the books, because they were very short and basic.  There are numerous fun and interesting ways to experience science.  From the nature studies in Charlotte Mason, children can learn in many hands-on studies.  All unit studies teach concepts and terms that students should know.  Many free lessons can be found in the library or online.  Just google the topic you would like to explore with the words lesson plan and the grade level.  You will discover everything that you need, and a lot more1

There are many good elementary science books from Apologia that kids will enjoy exploring.  My daughter thrived with Apologia.  She began the Biology book and loved it.  She completed the course by herself and excelled.  She loved biology so much, that she is now in the medical field and hopes to earn her Doctorate in Physical Therapy.  My third child is very literal, and Apologia’s writing style left him confused.  He did better with a traditional text.  Just give him the facts!  🙂

We discovered the DIVE science DVD’s and they were the perfect compliment to a traditional textbook.  He’s done well studying Biology, Earth Science, and Chemistry.  He’ll take Physics this year using Saxon Physics with the DIVE Physics DVDs. 

Favorite Homeschool Resources: Social Studies/History

One of my all-time favorite subjects is History.  I’ve always enjoyed history: all time periods and countries.  I love to watch documentaries!  My children have followed in my love for the subject, too.  Civics and elementary Social Studies aren’t as intriguing, but those subject are still important. 

Over the years, we’ve used many different curriculum in our homeschool for History and Social Studies.  We began with A Beka, which is a very thorough program and has a strong Christian worldview.  We next tried KONOS.  The reason we switched to Konos was because my daughter was so hands-on.  Also, my third child was 3 years old and wanted to be involved.  Konos was very easy to use with multiple ages/grade levels.  The unlimited sources for hands-on learning created a school day that the kids couldn’t wait to attend!  The lessons learned, while dressing in period clothing, were never forgotten.  The pictures, now chuckled at, were fun for them as they posed for the camera.  The concepts learned in these Unit Studies were mastered and easily carried over to other subjects.  This is a wonderful way to teach and learn.  It does take more teacher preparation, as do all unit studies.  But, the results are well worth it.  Consider unit studies if you want to teach multiple ages with one curriculum. 

Bob Jones University Press is also another good traditional curriculum with a Christian worldview.  All the necessary supplements are available for teachers to follow.  You have probably tried A Beka or Bob Jones, if you like a traditional School-Type approach.

History Modules are also very good.  We found a great source through Simply Charlotte Mason.  The website provides everything you need to get started.  They have lists of real books to use for each module, many that can be found in your library or free on Kindle.  There are ways to locate them on their website.  They also have a great amount of help for the teacher to follow.  We really enjoyed using this very user-friendly website!

History Odyssey from Pandia Press is what I’m using in my last year of teaching.  This program, using real books, is extremely easy to follow.  It’s neutral (not any particular worldview).  I always enjoy the discussions my student and I have after he reads and writes specific summaries.  We also add or dismiss books/articles that I feel will continue learning and discussions. 

My favorite thing about homeschooling is that, as kids grow into adulthood, I’ve been able to know what they’re learning, direct their learning, discuss their opinions, and pray with them.  In this way, their education becomes their own.  They haven’t just memorized my opinion, but they actually believe for themselves.  As they become independent, it’s important that they are strong in their views and beliefs.  Praying over the children and with them is the best way to ensure that God is not just talked about in your homeschool. 

Homeschool Lesson Planners

 Oh, my!  Home educating moms need tools to help them plan their school days.  The only problem with lesson planning organizers is that there are so many to choose from.  You can choose old-school paper books: some already bound, some spiral-bound, some loose-leaf, and some printables.  There are also many computer versions.  I think I have tried each type at one time or another.  You’ll probably be influenced  by the size of your student roster, your type of schooling, etc.  You can spend days on the internet searching for your favorite method. 

The first few years, when I had three students, I used a pre-printed notebook that included many extra pages for organizing.  In recent years, I began using these printable pages.  They were free. 

I used the weekly planner.
I love this method, because it allows flexibility.  I also use a pencil, not a pen.  This provides the ultimate flexibility.  And, homeschool moms really have to be flexible.  
Donna Young’s website is full of wonderful printables and many other tools to help homeschooling moms.  There are so many other wonderful sites out there, too.  Find your favorite.  If you find out you don’t like the features, then try a new type next year.  I love that about homeschooling.  There’s always room for improvement!

I Love Lesson Planning

Hind sight is 20/20.  Of course we’ve heard that and said that all our lives.  But, it’s true. Homeschooling lends itself to constant questioning.  During curriculum planning season I always experience some anxiety.  Did I do my best last year?  Can I get the right curriculum this year?  Are we behind?  etc….

I’ve always tried to match curriculum (learning style) to each child.  This can’t always be done.  Maybe you have two kids at the same level, but who learn differently.  One thing I learned in graduate school is to differentiate learning.  Say, you’re teaching a traditional text method…you can add and subtract learning activities that meet your child in their particular learning style.  This works well with unit studies.  If you have more than one child working on a project, give each one a particular job to do that accentuates their ways of learning and thinking. 

Use google to find unit studies full of grade-appropriate learning activities on just about any topic.  One great place to look (very user friendly) is: Education World.  Even if you don’t like all the activities, you can learn to adapt things to meet your situation.  The key is, don’t be afraid to try something different.  As long as your child grasps the concepts needed, you’ve succeeded.

I love curriculum and lesson planning.  It’s my favorite time of year, and it’s easier for me than the actual teaching day.  When I first started homeschooling, there was no internet for me to use.  I’ve fallen in love with google and love to search out anything I’m curious about.  What’s your favorite way to use the internet in your homeschool?